Reviews

Review: Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney

Reviewed by Harper Cleves Sally Rooney’s third novel, Beautiful World, Where Are You, was one of the most anticipated and hyped-up book releases in recent memory. For about two months in advance all of Dublin seemed to be waiting with bated breath for the 7 September release date advertised in every bookshop window — and a few fanatics could even ...

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“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)” review

By Eljeer Hawkins, Socialist Alternative (our sister organisation in the US) Black Caucus in commemoration of Black August Harlem, New York – In the summer of 1969, two historic musical festivals took place that would have epic proportions for the course of musical history and define one of the most politically turbulent times in U.S. history. The 1960s were a ...

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Review: The Mauritian directed by Kevin Macdonald

By Robert Ruane This is the harrowing, inspirational and true story of a prisoner who spent 14 years in Guantánamo Bay without a single charge against him and while experiencing extremely inhuman treatment. The director Kevin Macdonald splits the film into three different journeys; Mohamedou Ould Slahi’s fight for his life (played by Tahar Rahim), Slahi’s defense lawyer Nancy Hollander ...

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Review: Inside by Bo Burnham

By Chris Stewart  In late May, comedian and musician Bo Burnham released his new special Inside on Netflix. Created entirely during the coronavirus lockdown, Burnham wrote, directed, performed, and edited the special himself from his home.  Sat alone at his keyboard, similar to the videos which rocketed him to early YouTube fame back in 2006, Burnham gives us an hour ...

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Review: Superstore created by Justin Spitzer

By Sarah Killeen *Spoiler alerts* If you haven’t yet watched everything on Netflix and need a recommendation for something funny and light-hearted, then look no further than Superstore, the six-season comedy about the employees of the fictional Cloud Nine ‘big box store’. Warm and witty, Superstore offers some of the comforting escapism that we all need, yet it also has ...

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Review: The People Want To Overthrow The System

The People Want To Overthrow The System By Cedric Gérôme Published by International Socialist Alternative, 2021 Reviewed by Peter McGregor This book delves into the revolutionary and counter-revolutionary processes that unfolded in Tunisia between 2010 and 2013. Gérôme, a leading ISA member who was on the ground during much of these events, explains and analyses the various factors that led ...

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Review: Seaspiracy directed by Ali Tabrizi

Seaspiracy, Netflix, 2021, Director: Ali Tabrizi Reviewed by Heather O’Callaghan  In a new Netflix documentary, Seaspiracy, the British filmmaker, Ali Tabrizi, tackles ocean pollution and sustainability and embarks on a worldwide voyage to answer questions of why sea pollution has gotten so bad and is seemingly getting worse. More importantly, he asks what we, the world’s population, can do to ...

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Review: Framing Britney Spears

By Aislinn O’Keeffe In 1992, a ten-year-old Britney Spears performed a powerful version of The Judds ‘Love Can Build a Bridge’. The host, Ed McMahon, interviewing her afterwards remarks on her ‘pretty eyes’ and asks her whether or not she has a boyfriend. A clearly uncomfortable Britney continues to smile and be polite, choosing her words carefully as she attempts ...

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Review: Vasily Grossman’s “Stalingrad”

Reviewed by Manus Lenihan Vasily Grossman’s Stalingrad was originally published in the Soviet Union in 1952 under the title For a Just Cause, an epic novel about the pivotal battle of the Second World War. The narrative ends a few weeks into the battle with the fates of the main characters still up in the air, and millions of Soviet ...

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Film review: Dear Comrades!

Reviewed by Manus Lenihan  Dear Comrades!, a film directed and written by renowned filmmaker Andrei Konchalovsky, tells the story of a massacre of striking workers that took place in the Stalinist Soviet Union in 1962. This is an understated film, all in black and white, with sharp dialogue. Powerful and well-composed interior shots give way to outdoor scenes of crowds ...

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