Reviews

Review: Superstore created by Justin Spitzer

By Sarah Killeen *Spoiler alerts* If you haven’t yet watched everything on Netflix and need a recommendation for something funny and light-hearted, then look no further than Superstore, the six-season comedy about the employees of the fictional Cloud Nine ‘big box store’. Warm and witty, Superstore offers some of the comforting escapism that we all need, yet it also has ...

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Review: The People Want To Overthrow The System

The People Want To Overthrow The System By Cedric Gérôme Published by International Socialist Alternative, 2021 Reviewed by Peter McGregor This book delves into the revolutionary and counter-revolutionary processes that unfolded in Tunisia between 2010 and 2013. Gérôme, a leading ISA member who was on the ground during much of these events, explains and analyses the various factors that led ...

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Review: Seaspiracy directed by Ali Tabrizi

Seaspiracy, Netflix, 2021, Director: Ali Tabrizi Reviewed by Heather O’Callaghan  In a new Netflix documentary, Seaspiracy, the British filmmaker, Ali Tabrizi, tackles ocean pollution and sustainability and embarks on a worldwide voyage to answer questions of why sea pollution has gotten so bad and is seemingly getting worse. More importantly, he asks what we, the world’s population, can do to ...

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Review: Framing Britney Spears

By Aislinn O’Keeffe In 1992, a ten-year-old Britney Spears performed a powerful version of The Judds ‘Love Can Build a Bridge’. The host, Ed McMahon, interviewing her afterwards remarks on her ‘pretty eyes’ and asks her whether or not she has a boyfriend. A clearly uncomfortable Britney continues to smile and be polite, choosing her words carefully as she attempts ...

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Review: Vasily Grossman’s “Stalingrad”

Reviewed by Manus Lenihan Vasily Grossman’s Stalingrad was originally published in the Soviet Union in 1952 under the title For a Just Cause, an epic novel about the pivotal battle of the Second World War. The narrative ends a few weeks into the battle with the fates of the main characters still up in the air, and millions of Soviet ...

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Film review: Dear Comrades!

Reviewed by Manus Lenihan  Dear Comrades!, a film directed and written by renowned filmmaker Andrei Konchalovsky, tells the story of a massacre of striking workers that took place in the Stalinist Soviet Union in 1962. This is an understated film, all in black and white, with sharp dialogue. Powerful and well-composed interior shots give way to outdoor scenes of crowds ...

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Film review: Rocks

By Shane Finnan Sarah Gavron’s Rocks is a modern coming-of-age film, focused on the life and struggles of the main character, Olushola “Rocks” Omotoso. The film is set in pre-Covid London, and follows Rocks’ and her group of teenage girl schoolmates in their day-to-day life in multicultural, working-class London. The main plotline revolves around Rocks responding to and coping with ...

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Review: Unquiet Graves

Unquiet Graves opens with a harrowing re-enactment of the murder of two young men, Colm McCartney and Sean Farmer, in 1975. Returning from a Gaelic football game in Dublin, the two were stopped at a ‘British Army’ checkpoint near the village of Newtownhamilton in County Armagh and shot dead. Throughout the documentary families of victims detail the horrific experiences suffered ...

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Review: The Return of Nature

The Return of Nature By John Bellamy Foster  Monthly Review Press, 2020 Reviewed by Keishia Taylor John Bellamy Foster’s ground-breaking Marx’s Ecology in 2000 demonstrated that Marxism, from the beginning, dealt with ecological questions. Its long-awaited sequel, The Return of Nature: Socialism and Ecology, developed these ideas from the deaths of Marx and Darwin to the 1960s, tracing a continuous ...

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Review: Les Misérables directed by Ladj Ly

SRAB Films, Rectangle Productions, 2019 Reviewed by Róise McCann Ladj Ly’s Les Misérables (2019) borrows its name from Victor Hugo’s historic novel written in 1862 but is most relevant in 2020. The film is set in the district of Montfermeil, where Ly grew up and where the events of Hugo’s original were written to have taken place. “It hasn’t changed ...

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