News & Analysis

Irish capitalist state responsible for church terror

From the 1943 Cavan Fire in which 35 children and one adult perished after nuns refused to let girls escape to avoid them being seen in their night-gowns; to the enslavement of poor women in Magdalene Laundries, the last of which closed only in 1996; to the systemic cover-up of child sexual abuse; to the deplorable and sinister infant and child mortality rates in Mother & Baby Homes - the litany of abuse, degradation and oppression presided over by Church and State in Ireland, is simply confounding.

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Review: Capital in the Twenty-First Century – Thomas Picketty

The serious strategists of capitalism vaguely recognise that the future of capitalism is threatened by growing inequality. When the head of the IMF and the governor of the Bank of England join in the chorus demanding 'something should be done' or 'stability' will be threatened, it is clear that fear of strikes, revolt and revolution is growing among society's elite.

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Right to strike under threat

If this goes unchallenged it represents a reversal for the trade union movement of a principle won in legislation over 100 years ago that unions could not be made liable for bosses loss of income arising from trade disputes.

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Labour’s sell-out

An opinion Poll in early June showed the Labour Party with 4% support nationally. This is a measure of how comprehensively that party has disappointed those who voted for it in the 2011 General Election.

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Review: Jimmy’s Hall directed by Ken Loach

How dangerous could a parish hall with dance nights, boxing, singing lessons, poetry and art classes be? Ken Loaches new film “Jimmy’s Hall” shows how dangerous the Catholic Church considered one they didn’t control. The film is based on the true story of Jimmy Gralton, a socialist activist in Leitrim and the only person ever to be deported by the Irish Free State.

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Joe Higgins TD on Banking Inquiry Nomination

The government’s actions in cobbling together a majority on the Committee has been unbelievably crude and hamfisted. However, while this has shown to the world the cynical manoeuvrings that go on among the establishment political parties in the Oireachtas as they jockey for advantage, it fundamentally changes nothing. All parties understood that the government was always going to use its Dáil majority to have a majority on the Committee.

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