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The Socialist Party & the political position & operation of the ULA

The Socialist Party initiated the United Left Alliance along with the Workers and Unemployed Action Group (WUAG) and the People Before Profit Alliance (PBPA), just over two years ago. In recent months the problem of the ULA’s slow progress has been added to by important political mistakes and the withdrawal of WUAG. Now, as things stand, the Socialist Party has major differences with the position adopted by others in the United Left Alliance on a number of important political issues, and on the operation of the ULA itself. This article will outline some of the issues.

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Household Tax: The real registration figures

The government would like everyone to believe the household tax registration figures are coming along nicely, that the boycott is irrelevant now, citing registration figures of 1.1 million out of 1.6 million (almost 70%) having registered. The reality is far from that. Here we outline the real figures.

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Telling the story of the Visteon Occupation

John Maguire was the Unite the Union Convenor at the Visteon plant in Belfast before it closed in 2009. He played a leading role in the occupation of the plant which secured better redundancy packages for the workers. He has now written a play about the occupation which is due to premiere in Belfast in November. Here, John speaks to socialistparty.net about his upcoming play.

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EU: New radical suggestions of ‘austerity contracts’

A new interim report, entitled 'Towards a Genuine Economic and Monetary Union' was circulated by the President of the European Council, Herman Van Rompuy. This will be discussed at this week's European Council meeting. Here, the true vision of a fiscal and political union of the European establishments is made clear. It is a vision long on austerity and extremely short on democracy.

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From working class to ruling class: 100 years of the Irish Labour Party

The organised workers’ movement in Ireland was transformed at the beginning of the 20th century, amid an upsurge of intense industrial struggles that brought revolutionary sentiments to new sections of Irish society. Seeing the significance in these developments, James Connolly proposed “to the toilers of Ireland that it is time to make an effort to retrieve the situation and once more to raise the banner of a militant Irish labour movement upon the political field”.

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